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FAQ

What is GIS?

Trimble

Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS)

Potential Site Analysis

Market Penetration Analysis

Customer Desire Lines

Drive Time Analysis

Distance Decay

Customer Prospecting

Customer Derived Trade Area

What is GIS?

A geographic information system (GIS) integrates hardware, software, and data for capturing, managing, analyzing, and displaying all forms of geographically referenced information.

GIS allows us to view, understand, question, interpret, and visualize data in many ways that reveal relationships, patterns, and trends in the form of maps, globes, reports, and charts.

A GIS helps you answer questions and solve problems by looking at your data in a way that is quickly understood and easily shared.

GIS technology can be integrated into any enterprise information system framework.

 

Trimble

Positioning-centric information is changing the way people, businesses and governments work throughout the world. By applying Trimble’s advanced positioning solutions, productivity increases and safety improvements are being realized.
Though best known for GPS technology, Trimble integrates a wide range of positioning technologies including GPS, laser, optical and inertial technologies with application software, wireless communications, and services to provide complete commercial solutions. Its integrated solutions allow customers to collect, manage and analyze complex information faster and easier, making them more productive, efficient and profitable.
Trimble products are used in over 141 countries around the world. Employees in more than 30 countries, coupled with a highly capable network of dealers and distribution partners serve and support our customers.

For overĀ 33 years, Trimble has created unique positioning products that help customers grow their business. Our portfolio includes over 1,800 patents and serves as the basis for the broadest positioning offerings in the industry. Trimble augments its organic product development with strategic acquisitions to bring the latest positioning technologies to a wider market.

For more information about Trimble Click Here.

 

Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS)

Differential correction techniques are used to enhance the quality of location data gathered using global positioning system (GPS) receivers. Differential correction can be applied in real-time directly in the field or when postprocessing data in the office. Although both methods are based on the same underlying principles, each accesses different data sources and achieves different levels of accuracy. Combining both methods provides flexibility during data collection and improves data integrity.

The underlying premise of differential GPS (DGPS) requires that a GPS receiver, known as the base station, be set up on a precisely known location. The base station receiver calculates its position based on satellite signals and compares this location to the known location. The difference is applied to the GPS data recorded by the roving GPS receiver.

Potential Site Analysis

Market Penetration Analysis

A process that determines the percentage of a market area being reached based on the number of customers within an area divided by the total population in that area.

Customer Desire Lines

Desire lines, also known as spider diagrams, are a series of rays (lines) drawn from each customer to the store. They can be either unweighted (where each customer is counted equally) or weighted (where the line from each customer has a different color or thickness depending on variables such as sales or visits). Desire lines graphically illustrate the direction of pull in the marketplace. Desire lines also provide a quick and simple method to see if there is cannibalization.

Weighted values are used not to calculate desire lines but to display the lines differently. The thickness or color of each desire line is proportional to the weighted variable for that particular customer.

For more information about customer desire lines, click here.

Drive Time Analysis

Drive time analysis areas use street networks and approximate driving times based on attributes associated with the traversed streets around the Drive Time origins or point features. These origins may be point features such as a businesses, store fronts, organizations, agencies, hospitals, or service centers that may serve the area or region, and may have competitors or affiliates nearby. The output of the Drive Time service differs significantly from “Simple Rings”-generated areas, which define these areas based on straight-line (“as the crow flies”) distances from the origin points.

Distance Decay

Customer Prospecting

A type of market analysis that locates regions with appropriate demographic characteristics for targeting new customers.

Customer Derived Trade Area

Creates trade areas around stores based on the number of customers or volume attribute of each customer.